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Karlu Karlu Devils Marbles

Alice Springs Darwin Katherine Ulu r u Kings Canyon

Discover the iconic Karlu Karlu Devils Marbles, believed by the Warmungu Aboriginal people to be the fossilised eggs of the Rainbow Serpent.

The Devils Marbles are a collection of massive granite boulders strewn across a valley south of Tennant Creek. Standing at up to 6 metres high and formed over millions of years, they continue to crack and change.

Ancient mythology

Find out about the ancient Aboriginal mythology surrounding this geological marvel on a short self-guided walk around the reserve.

Read the excellent interpretive signage that shares the Dreaming story of the marbles, or ‘Karlu Karlu’ to the local Warmungu Aboriginal people, who believe they are the fossilised eggs of the Rainbow Serpent.

Sunrise and sunset specials

Camp at the reserve overnight for the memorable scene of the marbles glowing red and changing colour in the early morning light and setting sun. Bring your camera to capture the drama of this awesome ancient landscape.

Top 10 region awarded to The Red Centre, Australia. Lonely Planet Best in Travel 2019
  • Information

    Activities

    • Historical Sites and Heritage Locations
    • Natural Attractions
    • National Parks and Reserves

    Opening times

    Daily, 24 hours.

    Entry cost

    Free entry

    Facilities

    • Barbeque
    • Carpark
    • Picnic Area
    • Public Toilet

    Activities

    • Camping
    • Walk
  • Map

    Map

    What's nearby

    What's nearby

    Explore the NT
    Driving routesFlight paths
  • FAQS

    Can Karlu Karlu/Devils Marbles be done as a day trip?

    Karlu Karlu is a perfect day trip from Tennant Creek.

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    Do I need any passes or permits to visit Karlu Karlu/Devils Marbles?

    Karlu Karlu is free and you won't need a permit. If you wish to camp on site, there's a small charge which can be paid via an honesty system.

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    How do I get around Karlu Karlu/Devils Marbles?

    Once there, the best way to see Karlu Karlu is by foot. There are no official walks, so take one or more of the informal self-guided tracks. Remember that the local Aboriginal community ask you to refrain from climbing on the boulders.

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    How do I get to Karlu Karlu/Devils Marbles?

    Karlu Karlu (The Devils Marbles) is one hour south of Tennant Creek by car (96 km). There are also companies that run tours over multiple days from Alice Springs or Darwin that include a visit to Karlu Karlu.

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    How far is Karlu Karlu/Devils Marbles from the closest town?

    The closest town to Karlu Karlu (The Devils Marbles) is Tennant Creek, which is one hour north (96 km), while Alice Springs is 4.5 hours south (403 km).

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    What are the major attractions at Karlu Karlu/Devils Marbles?

    Tourists and travellers to Karlu Karlu are frequently surprised by just how many different rock formations there are! Make sure you have enough time to explore the whole area.

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    What should I bring with me to Karlu Karlu/Devils Marbles?

    Bring plenty of drinking water, a hat, sun-safe clothing and sunscreen. There is free wi-fi access at the site, so bring a camera and share your photos online.

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    When is the best time to visit Karlu Karlu/Devils Marbles?

    The climate around Karlu Karlu boasts blue skies for most of the year, so you can explore the region at any time, regardless of the season.

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    Where should I go next from Karlu Karlu/Devils Marbles?

    Heading south from Karlu Karlu gives you the perfect opportunity to check out the Red Centre, including Alice Springs, Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park and the West MacDonnell Ranges. If your appetite for ancient rock formations is strong, don't miss Kunjarra (The Pebbles), which is less than an hour south of Karlu Karlu.

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Things to see & do at Karlu Karlu

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